Stuff and things, Things and stuff
Reblogged from listener15  44,275 notes
  • Book one:

    a life-affirming story about pretentious teens with superiority complexes who have experiences and give nauseatingly quotable musings on philosophy and what it means to be alive, which often involves their enjoyment of books and tea and their condescending view of the popular kids as sheep

  • Book two:

    the same exact story, except this time it's being narrated by the teacher who has to deal with these asshole kids on a daily basis but is legally barred from saying "are you fucking kidding me" when they say some pretentious bullshit about how they prefer the smell of old books to the taste of alcohol. The teacher is re-telling the story to her friend at the bar, and her friend refuses to accept that these children could POSSIBLY be as pretentious as she makes them sound

Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue. By Armed police: Trigger happy | The Economist (via politicalmachine)

Reblogged from ssoux  59,243 notes

dragonheartedrabbit:

Going on right now in Ferguson: Police are raiding a church that has been stocked with medical supplies, food, and tear gas recovery kits for community members engaging in protests. This cannot be allowed to continue.

Stand up, speak out. 


"At some point in 2003, this one took place: ‘Wouldn’t it be cool if … you got off a train, and standing on the platform, you looked across the tracks and saw yourself. Then, in that moment, yourself committed suicide.’ 
Yes, that would be cool. But what’s the story? We didn’t know, but that opening was so pregnant with possibility we couldn’t put it down. Who was that other suicidal self? The question led us to our main character Sarah, and then to her clones, rather than the concept of clones leading us to a premise. But clones were rich, made for complex storytelling, covering all the bases for a genre loving writer/director team. Clones offer great visuals, tricky switcheroos, and technical production challenges. Psychologically, clones are a thematic gold mine, where identity crises are exponential and the nature versus nurture debate is writ large. Who am I? Where did I come from? Who is the original? A character facing these kinds of existential dilemmas works great in a paranoid thriller mystery. I think the genre basically demands it. 
For a couple years we tried to make Orphan Black work as a feature, but I don’t think we ever got through a draft. We couldn’t contain Sarah’s story in two hours. It was network shows like X Files and Alias that got us thinking about genre TV, then cable shows like True Blood, Dexter, and Breaking Bad convinced us where Orphan Black belonged was in the TV landscape. 
'Wouldn’t it be cool if… we actually got to make a crazy-ass clone show with a bunch of our sketchy friends and colleagues, starring super talented Tatiana Maslany?'
 10 years later, the answer is: ‘Hells, ya!’”
- Graeme Manson (Writer, Co-Creator) [x]

"At some point in 2003, this one took place: ‘Wouldn’t it be cool if … you got off a train, and standing on the platform, you looked across the tracks and saw yourself. Then, in that moment, yourself committed suicide.’

Yes, that would be cool. But what’s the story? We didn’t know, but that opening was so pregnant with possibility we couldn’t put it down. Who was that other suicidal self? The question led us to our main character Sarah, and then to her clones, rather than the concept of clones leading us to a premise. But clones were rich, made for complex storytelling, covering all the bases for a genre loving writer/director team. Clones offer great visuals, tricky switcheroos, and technical production challenges. Psychologically, clones are a thematic gold mine, where identity crises are exponential and the nature versus nurture debate is writ large. Who am I? Where did I come from? Who is the original? A character facing these kinds of existential dilemmas works great in a paranoid thriller mystery. I think the genre basically demands it.

For a couple years we tried to make Orphan Black work as a feature, but I don’t think we ever got through a draft. We couldn’t contain Sarah’s story in two hours. It was network shows like X Files and Alias that got us thinking about genre TV, then cable shows like True Blood, Dexter, and Breaking Bad convinced us where Orphan Black belonged was in the TV landscape.

'Wouldn’t it be cool if… we actually got to make a crazy-ass clone show with a bunch of our sketchy friends and colleagues, starring super talented Tatiana Maslany?'

10 years later, the answer is: ‘Hells, ya!’”

- Graeme Manson (Writer, Co-Creator) [x]